Announcements!

  • Law of Conservation of Mass

    Posted by Heather Spicola on 9/13/2019

    Students can use experimental results to determine if a system is open or closed.

    We started by watching this depiction of Lavoisier:  https://safeshare.tv/x/ss59d6ee3088553

    We followed this up by drawing an open and closed system.  Students then practiced identifying the missing information given the mass measurements for a chemical reaction.  LOCOM Problems

     

    Comments (0)
  • The Case of the Missing Necklace: Physical and Chemical Properties

    Posted by HEATHER SPICOLA on 9/12/2019

    sleuth Students can identify physical and chemical properties and changes.

     

    Today students worked at Crime Scene Investigators, trying to solve the mystery of the stolen necklace.  There was a mysterious white powder residue left on the jewelry box and student detectives were trying to solve who must have left the powder behind when they stole the necklace.  Students tested four known powders (corn starch-farmer, baking powder-chef, baby powder-nanny, and baking soda-scientist) with water, vinegar, pH paper, and iodine.  Then they performed the same tests to the mystery powder to deduce the identity of the criminal!

    Comments (0)
  • Counting Atoms

    Posted by HEATHER SPICOLA on 9/11/2019

    I can calculate the number of atoms in a chemical formula.

    This is such an important skill, especially for the next topic:  Law of Conservation of Mass.  Students played a game with a partner to practice calculating the number of atoms in a formula. https://youtu.be/fVcJqund5u8

    Students also practiced recognizing chemical and physical changes!

    Comments (0)
  • Counting Atoms

    Posted by HEATHER SPICOLA on 9/9/2019

    Students can count the number of elements and atoms in a chemical formula.

    Students took notes on the parts of a chemical formula:  chem formula

    Need some extra practice?  Try this:  https://mrskmclean.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/counting-atom-notes.pdf  Here it is in a video:  https://youtu.be/kqy78NIV5RM

    Comments (0)
  • Finishing Up!

    Posted by HEATHER SPICOLA on 9/6/2019

    Students can describe physical and chemical properties and changes.

    Students finished up the physical and chemical changes centers.  This site is a comprehensive source for so much of this unit:

    https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/activities/teaching-content/matter-9-studyjams-interactive-science-activities/ 

    Comments (0)
  • Chemical and Physical Changes Centers

    Posted by Heather Spicola on 9/5/2019

     Students can identify physical and chemical changes and the indicators of each.

    Then they worked on completing a variety of centers about chemical and physical changes.

     Here are two links they used:

    Research It!

    Watch It!

    Comments (0)
  • Vocabulary and Physical and Chemical Properties

    Posted by HEATHER SPICOLA on 8/30/2019

    Students can identify physical and chemical properties.

    Students started out comparing elements, looking for certain criteria.  We did 5problems on the homework.  This week's homework:  PT Homework Friday's quiz will be just like this homework and practice we did today.

     

    Students took notes on physical properties and observed properties of steel wool.  https://youtu.be/uJOGy0dgmUU

    Here's a little quiz on physical and chemical properties:  http://www.mrwiggersci.com/chem/Tutorials/Ch3-Rev-Pract-Chem-Phys-Prop-Chg-Blacksburg.htm

     

    Comments (0)
  • Symbols Quiz and Periodic Trends

    Posted by Heather Spicola on 8/30/2019

    Students can describe the trends on the Periodic Table.

     Students completed their third of five symbols quiz today.  I take the three highest grades, so there is still time!  Same list of symbols each time...nothing new, just takes practice.

    Students received homework, listed online under, "Help I Lost My...".  They first completed 10 similar practice questions and we reviewed them as a class.  Here are the samples with explanations:  PT Trends Explanations

    Have a great weekend!

    Comments (0)
  • Ozobots, Oh my!

    Posted by Heather Spicola on 8/28/2019

    Today students learned how to work with/color program Ozobots.  Tomorrow, they will program the Ozobots to find their way around/through a maze with information from the periodic table.

    Comments (0)
  • Trends, Families, Groups

    Posted by Heather Spicola on 8/27/2019

    I can describe trends on the Periodic Table.

    Students continue to work on knowing the traits of families on the Periodic Table.

    1. Alkali Metals:  very reactive, hydrogen is group 1 but a gas not a metal.  Francium is the most reactive metal.
    2. Alkaline Earth metals:  second most reactive metals
    3. Halogens:  Most reactive non-metals.  Only family to contain solid, liquid, and gas
    4. Noble gases:  non-reactive.  All have 8 valence electrons except for He, only has 2.

    Students played periodic table BINGO and answered some questions to guide a color-by-number about the periodic table.

    Comments (0)