• Indicative & Subjunctive Moods

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/26/2020

    The indicative mood of a verb makes a statement or asks a question. The subjunctive mood indirectly expresses a statement of necessity or a condition or wish that is contrary to fact. 

     

    Examples: 

     

    She rides home with her friend from practice. 

    • "Rides" is the indicative mood

    I wish that she were riding home from practice with her friend. 

    • "Were riding" is the subjunctive mood
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  • Collective Nouns

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/26/2020

    Collective nouns name a group, and they can be considered singular or plural. A collective noun is singular when it refers to a group as one whole. It is plural when it refers to individual members of a group. 

     

    Examples: 

     

    The jury has reached a verdict. 

    • "Jury" is a singular noun
    • "has reached" is a singular verb phrase 

    The cast are staying at different hotels. 

    • "Cast" is a plural noun 
    • "are staying" is a plural verb phrase

     

     

     

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  • More Action Verbs

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/22/2020

    An action verb is a word that names an action as opposed to merely establishing a state of being or a condition. Actions can be both mental and physical. 

     

    Example: The train chases itself downhill. 

    • "Chases" is an action verb
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  • Participles

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/22/2020

    Participles are verbs that end in -ed or -ing. They can function as adjectives or parts of verb phrases. 

     

    Examples:

     

    It was peaceful beneath the lines of marching clouds. 

    • "Marching" is a present participle (adjective)

    They had followed years of despair. 

    • "Followed" is a past participle (part of a verb phrase) 
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  • More Prepositional Phrases

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/22/2020

    A preposition is a word that shows the relationship between a noun or pronoun and some other word in a sentence.

    A prepositional phrase is a phrase that begins with a preposition. 

     

    Example: Some friends saved it for me in their barn. 

    • "For" and "in" are prepositions 
    • "For me" and "in their barn" are prepositional phrases
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  • Sentences

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/12/2020

    A sentence contains at least one subject and one verb that together express a complete thought. The first word of a sentence should be capitalized. 

     

    Example: 

     

    Shadows withdraw and lie away like smoke. 

    • "Shadows" is the subject and is also capitalized
    • "Withdraw" is the verb
    • "Lie" is also a verb 
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  • Present and Past-tense Verbs

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/12/2020

    A present-tense verb indicates an action that is occurring as you read the sentence to which the verb belongs.

    A past-tense verb indicates an action that has occurred before you read the sentence. 

     

    Examples: 

     

    And she nods her congratulations and she smiles. 

    • "Nods" and "smiles" indicate the present. 

    And she nodded her congratulations and she smiled. 

    • "Nodded" and "smiled" indicate the past. 
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  • Direct Objects

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/11/2020

    A direct object is a word that answers the question of what? or whom? after an action verb. The action indicated by the verb in a sentence is usually performed by the subject of the sentence. A direct object - someone or something - is the recipient of that action. 

     

    Example: They've stamped the papers. 

    • "Papers" is the direct object.
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  • Nouns

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/11/2020

    For singular nouns, form the possessive by adding -'s. For plural nouns that end in -s add just an apostrophe at the end of the word. Use an apostrophe and add an -s to form the possessive of an indefinite pronoun. 

     

    Example: Mary's husband was killed in the Civil War. 

    • Notice the 's in "Mary's"
    • "Mary's" is a possessive noun. 
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  • More Prepositional Phrases

    Posted by Grayson Nolen on 5/11/2020

    A prepositional phrase includes a preposition and a noun or a pronoun that is the object of the preposition. A preposition shows the relationship of a noun or a pronoun to some other word in the sentence. 

     

    Example: They were the first to blaze a path for justice. 

    • "For" is a preposition
    • "For justice" is a prepositional phrase. 

     

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